Why I Go to Summit Each Year?

This year will be my 6th PASS Summit that I will have attended. Some people have asked me why I still go, and what I get out of Summit that I don’t get from attending and speaking at SQL Saturdays. That’s an easy one for me to answer, but a long answer at that.

Networking

First and foremost, it’s for the networking. Getting to meetup with so many other like minded people is gratifying. This networking allows you to exchange ideas, war stories, and downright geek out with others that know what you are talking about and don’t have their eyes glaze over when discussing optimizer internals.

On top of all that it’s career building. You never know when you will have that one conversation with someone that leads to your next career step. It’s the meeting of the #SQLFamily face to face that can sometimes lead to your name being brought up about a new position that may be opening.  Believe me, I know of many people that have landed their next opportunity just from the interactions they have had at Summit.

Sessions

Learning, learning, learning is the name of the game. The ever-changing world of data happens so fast these days and I want to keep up. It is impossible in every environment to have a chance to get exposure to all the facets of SQL Server and other Data related topics. Summit gives us a wider view into what’s out there, and provides ideas of things I may be able to implement.

Vendors

I love gadgets and gizmos. Learning about what products are out there to make me more efficient at my job is always something I look forward too. Tools were essential for me when I was a lone DBA so I always looked forward to visiting each booth and see what’s new with them. Spending a lot of time on the show floor is a good investment of time–you get to meet folks who work for the vendors who support the community, and the tools and offerings they have.

CAT Team

Did you know the Microsoft Customary Advisory Team (CAT) team is onsite and willing to answer all your questions FOR FREE? Yep, no $300 for support to just pick up the phone, they are there in person. I’ve asked them a question each year pertaining to an environment I was working in, in which they were able to help me solve. The CAT team isn’t support–they work with the biggest workloads SQL Server supports and have seen almost everything.

Inspiration and Renewal

I always find a sense I renewal after attending Summit. I get a little kick start on new things to do at work that makes my job even more exciting. Many people get into rut or routine and their jobs can become mundane. Getting out of the office and seeing others that have the same passion for data as you can really help.

Lastly, Friendships

Summit is a #SQLFamily reunion of sorts. Many of us converse daily on twitter and only get to see each other in person once a year. Summit brings us all together. Some of us are lucky and are able to meet up with each other more frequently as we travel to SQL Saturdays and other events, but Summit is kinda like a home base for us. We all look forward to those #SQLHugs, catching up, and meeting new family members.

This year’s Summit will be a little different for me. When I am not getting my learn on, you will find me in the Denny Cherry & Associates (DCAC) Vendor Booth. Yep, this time I get to play booth babe. I can’t wait to be on the other side of the table telling other attendees what DCAC is all about and helping talk through some of their performance issues.

Anyhow this maybe my 6th PASS Summit but it won’t be my last. I encourage all who have never been or have gone before to go. It’s not too late to register, if you use discount code in the image you can save $150. There is so much you can get out of it each and every time to attend.

See you there!

Time for a Change

I am ecstatic to say I have joined Denny Cherry and Associates Consulting.

Lone No More

I am happy, excited, and nostalgic to announce that I am hanging up my Lone DBA hat and becoming a consultant. Yep, you read that correctly, I’ve decided after 16 years that I am going to change things up a bit. I am switching gears and will be helping those who are Lone DBAs and others by lending them a hand with their work loads.

Don’t get me wrong, I absolutely love being a Lone DBA. So, I will continue to speak on the topic and mentor others in that boat, but it’s time to give myself a little more freedom. Over the past 16 years I have been on call 24/7, even working while in labor, on vacations, nights, and weekends. I really think now is the time to slow down just a bit. My normal speed is 150 miles an hour so down shifting to 100 will allow me to spend time on what is important to me, my family.

Why DCAC?

First and foremost, the people. I am looking forward to working with and learning from Denny (B|T), Joey (B|T), and Kerry (B|T). These guys are wicked smart and most importantly know the importance of the SQL Community. They have a wealth of knowledge to share and I cannot wait to tap into it. With DCAC, I will be getting exposure to so many new environments as they are a renowned global provider of IT consulting and work on the cutting edge. I absolutely love learning new things and can’t wait to dive into things like Azure, which they excel at.

DCAC will give me the flexibility to speak and blog more which I genuinely want to do. Getting out into the community is also a strong passion of mine and moving out of the Lone DBA role will give me greater ability to do so.

Thanks, DCAC for bringing me on board, can’t wait to get started.

About Denny Cherry & Associates Consulting

The vetted and certified experts at Denny Cherry and Associates Consulting assist companies with attaining IT goals such as HA, scalability, SQL Server virtualization, migration and acceleration reliably, while finding ways to save on costs. With clients ranging from Fortune 50 corporations to small businesses, their commitment to each is the same: to provide a deft, high-speed IT environment that leverages every aspect of their platform: from architecture, to infrastructure, to network.

DCAC was named by CIOReview’s 20 Most Promising Azure Solution Providers of 2016.

Among Giants

Since becoming a Database Administrator I’ve always looked at Microsoft MVP’s as the giants in our field.  I never once thought I could be among them. I am very humbled to be recognized as a Microsoft Data Platform MVP for 2017. Thank you to those that deemed me worthy enough to nominate me.

What is an MVP?

According to Microsoft, the MVP Award is an annual award that recognizes exceptional technology community leaders worldwide who actively share their high quality, real world expertise with users and Microsoft. Microsoft MVPs represent a highly select group of experts. MVPs share a deep commitment to community and a willingness to help others.

How did I get here?

There is no magic formula to becoming an MVP.  I blog, I tweet, I did a couple podcasts, I speak at SQL Saturdays, I run my local chapter, and I am a Regional Mentor, but that doesn’t mean you have to do the same.  The point is I try to give back to that community what they have given to me. That’s all it takes. I share what I know and just do my thing, somehow that worked and you can do it too.

What can you do to help others achieve this?

NOMINATE, NOMINATE, NOMINATE!  There are so many valuable members in the community that have not become an MVP simply because they have never been nominated. I’ve had some tell me that they thought I was already an MVP so never thought to do so. I think for a lot of us waiting in the wings for our chance this is the case. So take the time and nominate someone you deem worthy, whether you think they are already one or not.

Here is the link to do so.

https://www.mvp.microsoft.com/en-us/Nomination/NominateAnMvp

Thank You

While I said it above, thank you again to all of those who nominated and believed in me. I could not have done it without the support of the #SQLFamily all these years. I’m honored to be a Microsoft MVP.

T-SQL Tuesday #84 – Helping New Speakers

Ok everyone; here goes my first crack at replying to a T-SQL Tuesday. For those that don’t know what it is, it’s a Monthly blog topic hosted by a member of the SQL Community. It was started originally by Adam Machanic (t | b)

This month’s topic hosted by Andy Yun (t | b) is on Growing New Speakers, which I find to be a perfect topic for me to leap off from, since this was my first year speaking and blogging.

How did I get started?

I 100% blame Derik Hammer (t | b) whom at the time was running my local user group. After attending just one meeting I was “volun-told” I would be presenting in August. Yep my name was now on the speaking calendar and I hadn’t even thought of a topic, let alone ever contemplated speaking.

My First Steps to Presenting

After the shock wore off, I sat back and began to think of anything of value I could talk about. Since it would be my first time speaking I really wanted a topic I could talk about and not necessarily a technical talk. Thus my Lone DBA talk was born. Everyone has something of value in their career to talk about, for me this seemed logical.

Simple Steps to Get Started

Where to begin is always the hardest part after choosing a topic. This was my approach. Of course there is a lot more to it, but getting this far a huge step forward.

  • Jot down a list of things you want to talk about
  • Then put them in a logical order
  • Then write a sentence or two about each line item

Just taking the time to do this will get you going.

Don’t Be Nervous (HA! Yeah Right)

It’s very hard not to be nervous. The way I “try” to get around this is to strike up a conversation some attendees prior to the start of the session while you are standing up front.  I pretend after the session begins that I am still having that one on one conversation with them.  For me it creates a “friendly” atmosphere rather than one like a teacher\ student. Now my biggest problem is talking fast, I try REALLY hard not to but it’s bound to happen as I get excited about the topic. My point is nobody is perfect at speaking everyone will have their fault, don’t let it discourage you.

Lastly

Start with your user group, listen to feedback, have another review your slide deck, and most of all enjoy it. There is nothing like a “speaker high”. Being able to share your knowledge and influence just one person is very rewarding.

This Idera ACE Has Been Busy

This year has been a whirlwind so far, thanks to the Idera ACE program. For those that don’t know what that is …

What is an Idera ACE? (According to Idera)

ace

“ACEs (Advisors & Community Educators) are active community members who have shown a passion for helping the community and sharing their knowledge. We help the ACEs pursue that passion by sponsoring travel to select events and offering guidance for soft skill training.”

Requirements to become an Idera ACE:

  • Enthusiastic members & leaders of the SQL community
  • Accomplished contributors to the SQL community
  • Good speaker, writer and presenter
  • Demonstrated a passion for educating fellow community members

Being an ACE has been both a very busy and very rewarding experience for me. Idera has given me the means to be able to share my knowledge as a Lone DBA and help others who are also in this predicament make the most of it. Since October last year, thanks to the generosity of the ACE program and the exposure it has given me, I have started my own blog, presented at a total of 9 SQL Saturdays, and 2 User Groups. I have also hosted 2 Idera #SQLChats on Twitter (links below) and participated in a SQL Hangout with Cathrine Wilhelmsen (B|T).

hangoutSo far, I have given my Lone DBA session to over 200+ SQL professionals, tweeted in SQL topic specific Idera #SQLChats to with a combined over 600 tweet interactions and had 200+ views on a video chat SQL Hangout.

One of my biggest talking points I try to convey is the power of networking and getting “virtual co-workers”.  Making those connections with others in the community is vital when you are a Lone DBA. I speak on the importance of building those relationships with those that can help you with their experience and expertise. Being an ACE has allowed me to vastly grow my network of “virtual co-workers”, by letting me travel to so many SQL Saturdays. I’ve had the pleasure in meeting so many speakers and attendees.  I make it a point at each of these events to make new co-workers and offer up any help I can give others.

The biggest reward for me is after my session is when attendees do their homework. Yes, I assign homework.  During the session, I ask each attendee to take advantage of what the SQL community has to offer by getting on Twitter and begin growing their own personal network.  Usually within a few days, many of them have created a Twitter account and has sent me a tweet.  I then take the opportunity to introduce them to the #sqlfamily.  I get a kick out of sitting back and watching each of them get involved in the community because me. It makes me giggle every time.

Of course, all good things must come to an end.  My year as an ACE is wrapping up in the next few months and I just wanted to take a minute and say thank you to Idera for a wonderful program. I encourage everyone to take full advantage of these types of programs and make the most of what they have to offer. I urge those that do, to not only take advantage for themselves but also to pay it forward. Give back to the community in any way you can. We can all benefit from each other with our shared experience and knowledge. The ACE program has really motivated me to get more involved and contribute to the #sqlfamily.

Stay tune to what comes next for me.

SQL Saturdays

 Washington DC

ABQ, New Mexico

Richmond, Virginia

Atlanta, Georgia

Pensacola, Florida

Louisville, Kentucky

Kansas City, Missouri

            User Groups

Richmond Virginia

Nashville Tennessee

            SQL Chats

Building Name Recognition

Building Your Career as SQL Developer or DBA

 

SQL Family: The Wonder Years

Last week, Bill Wolf aka @SQLWareWolf and I somehow got onto the topic of High School pictures. So in jest, I decided to post mine and hash tagged it with #SQLHSPics on Twitter. I challenged others to do the same, only really expecting @SQLWareWolf to respond in kind.  I was floored with over 100 picture responses from #SQLFamily. Many of them went searching through attics, yearbooks, called relatives, and other great lengths to be part of it. As always the response was heartwarming and hysterical to say the least.

Tweethspics

The reason why I am taking the time to blog about it is to reiterate how great it is to be part of this amazing community of SQL professionals. If you’re not already involved, then I encourage you to get involved. These wonderful people not only provide me with mentoring, education, laughter, and mental breaks, but also a true sense of family. Not many know, but I am going through some big things in my life and that week was more difficult than most. The #SQLFamily, unknowingly, helped me get through it with a smile and I am grateful more than you know.

Exhibit A: David Klee, @kleegeek (our winner for most laughs, re-tweets, and memes by far)

THEN &  NOW

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klee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After this picture was posted it lead to a slew of responses and new hashtags including #myfirstklee, which showed pictures of peoples reactions to David’s picture.

CaptureCapture2Capture3

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Love to all my #SQLFamily and thank you!

Where else would you find highly professional people posting pictures of their most awkward growing years for us all to comment freely about?

You know that, I can’t end this without posting some of the pictures from that week!

Enjoy!

Hs1 hs2 hs3 hs4 hs5 hs6 hs7 hs8 hs9 hs10 hs11 hs12hs13hs14hs16

November #SQLChat – How to Build your Name Recognition and SQL Network

For those who don’t know Idera Software sponsors a SQLChat on Twitter once a month. This month I got the privilege to host and had come up with a topic and questions for discussion. Below are the questions and answers I provided as well as some from others that chimed in. I think these are worth noting and give some valuable information especially to newbies of the SQL Community.

Q1: How have you benefited from networking with SQL professionals?

My Answer: As a lone DBA networking has gained me “co-workers”. I now have people to bounce ideas off of. I use these connections daily. Many have gained job opportunities based on just networking and getting to know other SQL professionals. I actually know several companies that hire based on SQL Networking relationships instead of utilizing recruiters. Networking exposes you to so many other facets of SQL you may not have otherwise looked into. My follow- up responses are depicted in italics.

A1: I have met incredible people who opened doors for my career. I wouldn’t be where I am today without them – @SQLDBA Kendal Van Dyke

I too have experienced this.  Getting connected and familiar with the SQL Community can really launch and expand on your career.

A1: If you don’t talk to folks in the same prof. you in a silo in many ways that can be a serious obstacle to progress – ‏@sqlmal  Malathi Mahadevan

I totally agree with this one. I found myself before I started networking in my own little world not really expanding my knowledge.

A1: I’ve built my network & ID’d a Go-To SQL Person for a variety of problems: Backups, mirroring, index, optimize, etc – @IrishSQL Rie Irish

I actually talk about this is my SQL Saturday presentation. Getting Go-To experts in all aspects of SQL Server is key, especially for a lone DBA like me. You cannot be an expert in everything, but you can build a network of those who are experts in their own realm of SQL Server.

A1: I was burnt out & wanted to change professions before I went to my first UG mtg and started meeting people and it re-energized me –@sqlgator Ed Watson

It is so easy in this field to get burnt out. I truly love how inspiring and motivating our community is.

Q2: What avenues have you used to build your SQL network?

My Answer: Twitter first and foremost. I am on it almost every day talking to SQLFamily and building those relationships. Even if it is just to say “Good Morning!”, people get used to seeing you every day and you becoming more involved. I also blog now and speak at SQL Saturdays. Now that I am an Idera ACE for 2016 you will be seeing more of me this year as I travel around to more SQL events. I am extremely excited to get even more involved.  Another great aspect of this community is that it’s easy for introverts to mingle their way in because it’s so inviting. We have lots of introverts in this community. There is a place for everyone.

A2: I’ve found that while SQL Sats, Summit etc are helpful, adding in Twitter is like rocket fuel for the process- @sqlstudent144 Kenneth Fisher

This is very true, add Twitter to your networking tools and you will see how much of an impact it will have.

A2: On Twitter since an amazing #SQLPass at the recommendation of @GlennAlanBerry been blown away by the SQL Love and support on Twitter – @_adamnichols Adam Nichols

I love this one. It goes to show how inviting our community is to new comers. The passion for what we all do shines through even in just 140 characters.

A2: Twitter! SQLSaturdays, user groups and events like PASS Summit and SQLBits. Newest is Slack – @cathrinew Cathrine Willhelmsen

The WIT (SQL Women In Technology) group has just started a new Slack channel, for those ladies that want to get involved, drop me an email or direct message I’ll get you invited.

A2: I joined the #sqlchat today and from reading the Tweets, it feels like a great SQL resource – @crhanks Cary Hanks

This is exactly why we do these types of things. It helps to get more involved and share our experiences with each other.

Q3: How can newcomers get started on networking within the SQL community?

My Answer: Get a Twitter account! Just start interacting don’t be afraid to jump into conversations, we don’t bite and I hear we have cookies.  Make sure when you setup your Twitter account and use SQL in your handle or at least in your Bio. It helps us recognize family members. In addition, change your avatar to an actual picture of yourself, start getting yourself out there. It’s great to put a face with a name.

A3:  Advice for to newcomers is to start with your local user group, attend SQL Saturdays and talk to the organizer and Tweet. – @LindsayOClark Lindsay Clark

If you don’t know if your town has a local user group, visit the PASS website and look it up.  If there is not one near you, try a virtual chapter those too are a great resource and way to get involved.

A3: Agreed if it is on Twitter and you can see it, it’s a public conversation –jump in. – @DanielGlenn

This a great tip to remember and several others chimed in and stated the exact same thing. Jump in to conversations freely, people will respond to you. Don’t be afraid to do so.

A3: Getting out of lurker mode on Twitter helps. Introduce yourself! I  often suggest new users of Twitter give a look to @BrentO’s free ebook on the topic brentozar.com/twitter/book@vickyharp Vicky Harp

This is fantastic resource for those new to Twitter. Great advice Vicky! I also completely agree with getting out of lurker mode. You can gain a lot by watching conversations and reading the information shared but you again even more by participating.

Q4: Do you have name recognition? Why do you think that’s important?

My Answer: I am working on building name recognition, I’ve begun using SQLEspresso on my blog, cards, and emails. I think it’s easier to remember then a name. I think building name recognition just opens doors it is not about becoming “SQLFamous”.  I’ll admit it floors me when someone recognizes me as SQLEspresso, I get a kick out of it.

A4: I heard “Oh, hey, you’re @AMtwo!” more than once at PASS Summit. Name recognition helps build relationships – @AMTwo  Andy

I’ve had this same thing happen, many others in the chat said they did too.  Since we are all located all over the globe social media, blogs etc. are our personalities and only interaction with many #SQLFamily members.  It’s important to build that name recognition and keep building it in order for people to remember you because of the lack of in person interactions.

A4: I have some name recognition. Enough for me. It helps when I need answers & gives more weight when I give answers – @IrishSQL Rie Irish

A little goes a long way. I agree with Rie, the more your name is out there the more credence you responses and questions get.

A4: I try to use the same photo of myself everywhere to help with self-brand recognition –  @johnsterrett  John Sterrett

This too is great advice. If you are trying to build a brand or name recognition consistency across all platforms is a must.  I’ve actually just started doing this myself.

Q5: What names or brands do you recognize? Why do you think that is?  

My Answer: There are so many names in the SQL Community I recognize because they make themselves visible and give back to the community.  They also promote others to get involved; you can see their passion for SQL Server and its family.

A5: Brent Ozar (wicked marketing chops) Paul Randal, Kimberly Tripp etc. They all have excellent branding –@sqlrus John Morehouse

These are a few of the “big” names you see every day. Why are they big names… because they give their time and knowledge to our community. They are active and are consistent in their brands image.

A5: I recognize people who write books/blogs, who speak at UGs & SQL Saturday type events, & engage, on Twitter. –@SQLDBA Kendal Van Dyke

I think Kendal’s response enforces the idea of noticing those that get involved and give back.

A5: Leaders are “created” by their efforts and community acknowledgement. The most referenced names are that was for a reason. – @tomsql Tom Staab

A5: I think cheerful helpers in the SQL community gain name recognition whether they seek it or not. –@vickyharp Vicky Harp

I can’t agree more with Tom and Vicky. You don’t have to seek name recognition it is naturally created. You probably have more name recognition than you think.

Q6: How do you find time to network and build your personal brand? Are you able to do it as much as you’d like?

My Answer: I make time. Even just a little here and there makes a difference. I take a minute every day to pop into Twitter and say Hi.  I have started writing a weekly blog, as time allows and I give my time to my SQL user group. For those who know me personally they know I have a crazy schedule and as a lone DBA my work load is tremendous but the SQL community is important to me and I find time to network and get involved. It’s worth every minute of my time.

A6: I spend time building my brand and networking without knowing I am doing it. I focus on things I am passionate about so it’s really just my hobby time – @johnsterrett  John Sterrett

Many people have a brand and don’t even know they do. It’s just something the freely develops and can be cultivated if wanted.  I also find and think most people will agree if you’re passionate about SQL server it is a hobby for you and you make time. It’s one of the great things about our careers; we find it fun and don’t think of it as a job.

A6: I wish I could spend time participating in #SQLChat today. A meeting’s preventing me from it. Just wanted to say I <3 #SqlFamily –@DBAArgenis Argenis Fernandez

This is exactly my point. You make time. Argenis wanted to support me in this #SQLChat and made it a point to make time. Thanks Argenis!

All and all the chat session went really well. There are a lot of take a ways from this. The few I have I highlighted here helps drive home my point.  My notifications on Twitter blew up with so many responses; I wish I could include more in this post. We actually broke a record for Idera on the most tweets and involvement for a #SQLChat with over 370 tweets.  Thanks to all that played a part in the conversation, I hope it was as fun for you as it was for me. I am looking forward to next month’s topic.

Attending Summit as a New Leader

It’s that time again where everyone writes their post PASS Summit Blog and tells of the great time they had with SQL Family and all the exciting new things they learned.  While those are both very true for me as well, I want to talk about how it felt to go to Summit as a new leader in the community.

This year I became a Chapter Leader and spent Tuesday at Summit in the PASS Chapter Leader and SQL Saturday meetings. It was an honor for me to walk into those meetings and collaborate with such a phenomenal group of people.  It was even more remarkable to be called out by name by more than a few.  I even commented to a couple of people that I can’t believe I was there legitimately (yes, I have crashed a few speaker dinners in my day, while not being a speaker).  Since it was only Tuesday, being involved in these meetings really helped to set a positive outlook for the remainder of my time at the Summit.

Sports-Leadership-Quotes-4

Now there were more than a few “old timers” there that had been running their chapter for years and wasn’t nearly as enthralled with some of the information being presented in the meeting. They had heard it all before, but for me it was all new and stimulating. As I sat back and listened to their input and looked at the slides, I was impressed to see how many active chapters PASS has and how many SQL Saturdays were delivered in 2015. The staggering amount of effort and time that people freely give to help build others and improve this community is astounding to me.  I don’t think people realize how much time, effort and passion goes into running a chapter or putting on a SQL Saturday.  I was inspired.

One of my favorite parts of the meetings were the question and answer sessions with vendor representatives. It really opened my eyes on how both parties need and support the other’s initiatives. It was a reminder that they are not just there to give us money, they also provide education, and give backing to community members willing to share their knowledge with others. Programs such as the Idera Ace Program and Friends of Red-gate do just that.  In return for their funding chapters and community members give them exposure, contact lists, and help promote their products. It’s very much a give and take. The vendors also gave great advice for chapter leaders as when and how to get sponsorship; timing and planning ahead are essential. I took lots of notes.

For the remainder of Summit, I talked to other leaders and got ideas to take back to my chapter. I worked on making even more connections and getting speakers lined up for our upcoming 2016 calendar year. I engaged in discussions on how to get more involved and build future leaders.

It was kind of different take on Summit for me. Don’t get me wrong I attended my share of sessions including a great Pre Con by Argenis Fernandez, David Klee and Jimmy May on Virtualization. I went to all the PASS Sponsored night time events and attended more than my fair share of Vendor parties. It was a fantastic week with the #SQLFamily as always.  There is nothing like spending a week with like-minded people discussing things you are passionate about.

Now that it’s wrapped up, I want to take that inspiration I gained and do something more with it. This year I have set a goal for myself to be an example of how to get involved and make a difference.  I would love to help inspire future leaders by spreading my enthusiasm through speaking at SQL Saturdays, running my chapter and volunteering where ever needed. I challenge you to do the same.

See you guys at the next PASS Summit I will be there for sure!

Everything is coming up ACE’s

I am thrilled to announce that I have been chosen as one of the 2016 Idera ACE’s. It is truly an honor to be part of this great program and give back to the SQL community.

What is an Idera ACE?

According to Idera.small ace duck

“ACEs (Advisors & Community Educators) are active community members who have shown a passion for helping the community and sharing their knowledge. We help the ACEs pursue that passion by sponsoring travel to
select events and offering guidance for soft skill training.

Requirements to become an Idera ACE:

  • Enthusiastic members & leaders of the SQL community
  • Accomplished contributors to the SQL community
  • Good speaker, writer and presenter
  • Demonstrated a passion for educating fellow community members

My SQL Saturday Addiction

Recently I joked on Twitter, that I am now addicted to SQL Saturday’s and need a GO FUND ME just to pay for them all. Well, that is no longer the case. As an ACE, Idera will generously sponsor some of my 2016 speaking engagements. This year I will have attended 5, next year with Idera’s help I hope to attend even more.  This amazing gift will allow me to not only grow in my career but also help others to as well.

What I Love About This

Being an ACE doesn’t mean we have to be sales people for Idera. Instead we are given means to enrich our knowledge about Idera along with opportunities to give feedback. We get to participate in Beta testing and tell them how we have used their products in the past, to help them continually improve. I cannot wait to start working with the product teams.

The Need for Tools

As a lone DBA, I rely on products such as those from Idera to juggle my daily work load. As I say in my session about Survival Techniques for a Lone DBA, I have to be an octopus to get all the work done. Products like the ones from Idera act as my extra arms. They allow me to quickly monitor my servers, perform administrative tasks, and perform health checks among many other things without having to write my own scripts. The time these tools save me is invaluable so I am happy to be able to contribute my input on them.

Thanks

I thank Idera for investing in me. I will fully take advantage and make the most of it. I am humbled by the fact I have been chosen as a 2016 Idera ACE. Congrats to the other newly appointed ACE’s, I look forward to working with you!

 

Master of None

Being a Lone DBA gives you so much exposure to so many facets of SQL Server. Since I am just one I get to work on Replication, Administration, Security, Business Intelligence, Disaster Recovery, Reporting Services, Integration Services, Analysis Services, Database design, Development, Performance… you name it I get to dabble in it. However, being able to work on every facet also means I will never be a Master at any of it and that’s okay by me.
jack

For a Type A personality, like me, this is a hard thing to come to terms with. I‘ve learned with time to be fine with not knowing everything. I relish in the fact that I get to do and experience MUCH more than most. Those that are not Lone DBAs have to divide and conquer or are responsible for just a hand full of areas (like security, or DR, or Change management). However in our line of work, there is always a need for GO TO Experts. Through networking, I have gained several friends that have become my experts. I have an expert for things like PowerShell, Database Internals, Storage, Availability Groups, T-SQL etc… If I need expert knowledge on something they are always willing to lend a hand. If you don’t have a network of GO TO experts whether you are a Lone DBA or not, I strongly suggest you start building those relationships.

So, that being said, I will never be one of those GO TO experts. However, if someone asks a question if I have ever done something or had a particular issue…in most cases the answer is yes.  How do I accomplish that? The answer is by creating a broad skill set. I self-teach by dabbling in things. I am not afraid of trial and error. I learn all the SQL Tools I can and use them where appropriate.  I attend as many SQL training events I can manage.  learmingI am always trying to further diversify my knowledge base.  I attend my user group meetings (now run them), virtual training sessions, watch 24HOP sessions, I get the Summit Sessions on USB every year to watch when I have time, and finally I attend SQL Saturdays.  All of these avenues are great ways to further my knowledge base.

The most important tip I can give is learn just what you need to get most jobs done and don’t try to master it. It’s okay to be a master of none, revel in it, and embrace you get work on so many things. It will make you very marketable; there are not many of us that are given that opportunity.