Everything is coming up ACE’s

I am thrilled to announce that I have been chosen as one of the 2016 Idera ACE’s. It is truly an honor to be part of this great program and give back to the SQL community.

What is an Idera ACE?

According to Idera.small ace duck

“ACEs (Advisors & Community Educators) are active community members who have shown a passion for helping the community and sharing their knowledge. We help the ACEs pursue that passion by sponsoring travel to
select events and offering guidance for soft skill training.

Requirements to become an Idera ACE:

  • Enthusiastic members & leaders of the SQL community
  • Accomplished contributors to the SQL community
  • Good speaker, writer and presenter
  • Demonstrated a passion for educating fellow community members

My SQL Saturday Addiction

Recently I joked on Twitter, that I am now addicted to SQL Saturday’s and need a GO FUND ME just to pay for them all. Well, that is no longer the case. As an ACE, Idera will generously sponsor some of my 2016 speaking engagements. This year I will have attended 5, next year with Idera’s help I hope to attend even more.  This amazing gift will allow me to not only grow in my career but also help others to as well.

What I Love About This

Being an ACE doesn’t mean we have to be sales people for Idera. Instead we are given means to enrich our knowledge about Idera along with opportunities to give feedback. We get to participate in Beta testing and tell them how we have used their products in the past, to help them continually improve. I cannot wait to start working with the product teams.

The Need for Tools

As a lone DBA, I rely on products such as those from Idera to juggle my daily work load. As I say in my session about Survival Techniques for a Lone DBA, I have to be an octopus to get all the work done. Products like the ones from Idera act as my extra arms. They allow me to quickly monitor my servers, perform administrative tasks, and perform health checks among many other things without having to write my own scripts. The time these tools save me is invaluable so I am happy to be able to contribute my input on them.

Thanks

I thank Idera for investing in me. I will fully take advantage and make the most of it. I am humbled by the fact I have been chosen as a 2016 Idera ACE. Congrats to the other newly appointed ACE’s, I look forward to working with you!

 

Initial SQL Server Configurations

Wonder if I Do Things Differently?

I am always wondering what other DBA’s do and if I am doing things differently. One such thing is my initial server setups, basically, what I configure for each of my new servers. So, why not blog about it and see what others chime in with after they read this. Keeping in mind that everyone has different requirements and different ways that they like to do the actual configurations.

For now, I am not going to go into what each one of these configurations do and why I choose the value I do. That’s for another time. If you want that information you can always go to Books Online or just Google it. In this case, I am just going to give you a running list with scripts; that I’ve added too over the years based on best practices and experience.

How Does Yours Compare?

I’d really love to hear what others do and if I may have missed something that you like to implement that may benefit me as well.  So leave a comment, tweet to me, or send me an email let’s compare notes.

The List

So here are the basics setups I do on every server post install in no particular order.

* Value varies based on server configuration

  1. Min and Max Memory *

  1. Enable and Configure Database Mail ( This is only to enable, full script will be in later post)

  1. Set Default Database Locations

  1. Set SQL Agent Job History Retentions

  1. Set Cost threshold for Parallelism *

  1. Set Max Degree of a Parallelism *

  1. Set Optimize for Adhoc work loads

  1. Change Number of Error Logs

  1. Create Cycle Error Log Job

  1. Add Additional TempDB Files All With Same Size and Growth Rates *

  1. Set Media Retention

  1. Set Backup Compression Default On

  1. Change to Audit Successful and Failed Logins

  1. Set Default Growths in Model Not Be Percentages

  1. Set AD Hoc Distributed Queries off 
  2. Set CLR Enabled off 
  3. Set Ole Automation Procedures off 
  4. Set Scan For Startup Procs off 
  5. Set xp_cmdshell off
  6. Setup Operators

  1. Set Up Alerts 17-25 and Error codes  823,824,825 (Remember to add the alerts to the operator)

Note: Most of these can be set using GUI as well as the scripts above. Also, in addition to these configurations, I make sure that the server is brought up to the most current stable CU or Service Pack. Everyone’s environment is different, my list may not be right for you.

Master of None

Being a Lone DBA gives you so much exposure to so many facets of SQL Server. Since I am just one I get to work on Replication, Administration, Security, Business Intelligence, Disaster Recovery, Reporting Services, Integration Services, Analysis Services, Database design, Development, Performance… you name it I get to dabble in it. However, being able to work on every facet also means I will never be a Master at any of it and that’s okay by me.
jack

For a Type A personality, like me, this is a hard thing to come to terms with. I‘ve learned with time to be fine with not knowing everything. I relish in the fact that I get to do and experience MUCH more than most. Those that are not Lone DBAs have to divide and conquer or are responsible for just a hand full of areas (like security, or DR, or Change management). However in our line of work, there is always a need for GO TO Experts. Through networking, I have gained several friends that have become my experts. I have an expert for things like PowerShell, Database Internals, Storage, Availability Groups, T-SQL etc… If I need expert knowledge on something they are always willing to lend a hand. If you don’t have a network of GO TO experts whether you are a Lone DBA or not, I strongly suggest you start building those relationships.

So, that being said, I will never be one of those GO TO experts. However, if someone asks a question if I have ever done something or had a particular issue…in most cases the answer is yes.  How do I accomplish that? The answer is by creating a broad skill set. I self-teach by dabbling in things. I am not afraid of trial and error. I learn all the SQL Tools I can and use them where appropriate.  I attend as many SQL training events I can manage.  learmingI am always trying to further diversify my knowledge base.  I attend my user group meetings (now run them), virtual training sessions, watch 24HOP sessions, I get the Summit Sessions on USB every year to watch when I have time, and finally I attend SQL Saturdays.  All of these avenues are great ways to further my knowledge base.

The most important tip I can give is learn just what you need to get most jobs done and don’t try to master it. It’s okay to be a master of none, revel in it, and embrace you get work on so many things. It will make you very marketable; there are not many of us that are given that opportunity.